Business in your village

Business in your village

Local business: We want to hear from you

We are developing a village business action plan to provide a strategic framework for working with our partners to support businesses in our main streets and local areas.

To help us develop a relevant and useful policy, we want to hear about the opportunities and challenges you are now facing.

Our recently adopted economic development strategy recognises that local business is a vital component of the city's economy, as are the main streets and suburbs where our small businesses mainly operate.

The strategy's vision for Sydney is a strong central core supported by a network of unique, thriving local centres – the lifeblood of these centres being small business. 

We see our role as supporting economic vitality in the inner city, whether it's with direct support through seminars, grants and capacity-building, or indirectly with hosting events that attract visitors to Sydney or providing important infrastructure. 

City Business logo 

We know businesses are experiencing significant changes presenting challenges and opportunities to both owners and workers. Just one example is the increasing importance of digital technologies, which are changing the way businesses need to interact with their customers.

You can give us your thoughts this June, or email citybusiness@cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au for more info.

Business in the villages

The City of Sydney is helping nurture economic development in the 10 village centres across the local area. As part of this, we developed a new Economic Development Strategy to keep Sydney prosperous.

Local business is essential to our village centres as it provides localised services and employment to our residents, which also reduces the pressure on our transport system and infrastructure.

Each of our village centres is unique. They have their own character and inspire a sense of community portrayed in our presentation, Slices of Sydney.

This section features an overview of each village centre in terms of business opportunities, existing business and who lives and works in the area.

You’ll also find contact details for the City's business precincts coordinator and the local chamber of commerce and/or business association for each village.

CBD and Harbour

Once dominated by the now closed port facilities, the proposed Barangaroo development promises new business opportunities for the CBD and Harbour village through increased residential and commercial activity in the north-western part of the peninsula.

Chinatown and CBD South

Retail and food and drink outlets provide the most dominant business opportunities in the Chinatown and CBD South village, which is the smallest of the 10 village centres. The area is particularly famous for its range of Asian cuisine, Chinese stores, restaurants and the bustling Friday night markets in Dixon Street.

Crown and Baptist Streets

Although the fashion industry has played a long-standing role in the Surry Hills economy, business opportunities around Crown and Baptist Streets are emerging for creative start-ups and dining/café businesses.

Glebe Point Road

Changes to licensing laws have seen a flourish of small bars and eateries in the Glebe, Forest Lodge and Annandale areas, with new businesses taking advantage of the unique demography and geography of Glebe Point Road.

Green Square and City South

Green Square is thought to be the largest redevelopment project of its kind in Australia and it will provide new business opportunities for a diverse range of businesses in Green Square and City South.

Harris Street

Creative industries, higher education and research are expected to continue to dominate employment in the Harris Street village, which sits on the Pyrmont peninsula.

King Street

With its close proximity to the city centre and its long held reputation for drawing the city's fringe, bohemian and alternative crowd, King Street village offers business opportunities in retail, hospitality and entertainment.

Macleay Street and Woolloomooloo

Australia's most densely populated district, the Macleay Street and Woolloomooloo village around Kings Cross, Potts Point and Elizabeth Bay is famous for its nightlife and dining, with many new upmarket bars and restaurants opening in recent years.

Oxford Street

The Oxford Street village has long been a creative and cultural centre. An integral part of Sydney's gay and lesbian scene, the area is well-known for shopping, eating out, art house cinemas, heritage buildings, creative industries and major educational facilities.

Redfern Street

The City's shopfront improvement program has been a major catalyst in driving renewed interest in the Redfern Street village, with new shops, bars and restaurants invigorating the charm and character of this historical area.

Contacts

City of Sydney
Business Precinct Coordinator02 9265 9333

Contacts for State and Federal Government organisations and local associations are listed on our more help for business page.

Links

Slices of Sydney: a taste of our villages

Last updated: Tuesday, 10 June 2014