Dictionary of Sydney

Dictionary of Sydney

Look it up

If it happened in Sydney, it belongs in the city’s online historical dictionary.

Put together as a collaborative not-for-profit venture in digital public history, it’s an ever-growing resource you can trust. Universities, cultural institutions, historical societies and historians, including the City’s History Unit, are all contributing to this amazing resource.

The site details the history of the entire Sydney metropolitan area, not just areas covered by the City. More than 700 suburbs are covered, with each entry complete with demographic information and precise boundary maps.

Information is presented using images, film, sound and historical essays. Users are welcome to add feedback or suggest information for the site.

The Dictionary of Sydney is our city’s history, online and connected.

Links

Dictionary of Sydney

From the blog

  • Colonial scandal and murder – 3 February 2016

    There is nothing like reading about a colourful historical figure to remind ourselves how rich and complicated our society actually is. This week I was struck by the story of Robert Wardell. The name might seem a little bit familiar to you. Wardell Road in Marrickville which leads from Petersham to Earlwood was named after […]

  • Sydney’s hydrofoils – 27 January 2016

    A couple of weeks ago when I was last in, I commented upon the hydrofoil footage in David Bowie’s film clip China Girl and it transpired that some of our listeners weren’t quite sure what a hydrofoil was. So today I thought we’d better rectify that. We have a lot about ferries on Sydney Harbour […]

  • New tour! Sydney Harbour Islands – 20 January 2016

    The Dictionary of Sydney has launched a new tour! Following on from Convict Parramatta, we can now explore Sydney’s harbour islands on our mobile devices, from the Royal Australian Navy base we know as Garden Island in the east, to the prison-turned-dockyard, Cockatoo Island, in the west. I spoke with Mitch about it on 2SER […]

Last updated: Tuesday, 4 December 2012